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Kindle Touch 3G, Free 3G + Wi-Fi, 6″ E Ink Display



Kindle Touch 3G, Free 3G + Wi-Fi, 6″ E Ink Display

  • Ships in Certified Frustration-Free Packaging

Top-of-the-line e-reader, with touch and free 3G wireless – Free 3G wireless, no annual contracts or monthly fees – Download books anywhere, no hunting for Wi-Fi hotspots – 3G wireless works globally – Most-advanced E Ink display, now with multi-touch – New sleek design – 8% lighter, 11% smaller, holds 3,000 books – Text-to-speech, plus audio books and mp3s – Massive book selection, over 800,000 titles are .99 or less – New – Borrow Kindle books from your public library

List Price: $ 189.00

Price: $ 189.00

4 responses to “Kindle Touch 3G, Free 3G + Wi-Fi, 6″ E Ink Display”

  1. Scott says:
    5,605 of 5,718 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Solid Successor to the Kindle Keyboard, November 14, 2011
    By 
    Scott
    (TOP 10 REVIEWER)
      
    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)
      
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    For my review, I’m going to focus it on the differences between the previous Kindle Keyboard, Wi-Fi, 6″ E Ink Display – includes Special Offers & Sponsored Screensavers (which I’ll refer to as the K3), and the Kindle Touch (KT)

    USE – As far as the reading experience, I really like the touch compared to the physical buttons on the previous generation. At first I was worried that I would constantly be turning the page from accidentally touching the screen, but this didn’t become much of an issue. The screen is broken up into mapped sections, so if you touch the far left side that covers about 1″ of the left of the screen, it goes to the previous page. If you touch anywhere on the other 80% of the screen beside that, it goes forward. Touch the top 1″ margin, and it will bring up the menu. There is also a physical button on the bottom of the touch that serves as the Home button and will take you straight to the Home menu. The area where I found the touch most useful is the dictionary. Previously, if I wanted to look up the definition of a word, I had to use the clunky joystick to navigate through the text. If a word was at the very bottom at the end of the sentence, sometimes I’d usually just ignore it rather than go through the trouble of pressing that joystick 15 times. With the Touch, I can simply touch the word and hold it down for about 1.5 seconds (so it knows I’m not trying to turn the page) to access the dictionary, which is incredibly useful and time-saving. Underlining phrases and highlighting works almost the same way. You hold down the first word in the sentence, then after two-three seconds it will recognize what you are doing, and then you drag your finger across the rest. I never used to do this before but now I do it all the time. The Kindle Fire actually handles the dictionary search much better. Though this is probably one of the only things the Fire does better than the Touch as far as ebooks. When you swipe your finger across the page or drag it down to change, the page changes just like it did with the Kindle Keyboard, in that it draws the next page. So there is a very short flash. It does not seamlessly and fluidly switch like it does with an iPad or what you would expect if you scrolled your mouse down a web site. This doesn’t detract from it at all for me. There is a new X-Ray feature that you can click on to bring up more ideas and common features of the book, but it is apparently only available on select titles and none of my books had it so I couldn’t try it out. The Kindle Touch does not allow you to switch the display to landscape mode like the basic Kindle does. I have no idea why but I would be surprised if they did not resolve this in a future firmware update.

    Form Factor – Even though the changes are fairly small, they feel significant. The KT is only .1″ less width, and a little over half an inch shorter than the K3, but after several hours of using it, I feel like I can hold it longer with one hand than with the K3. I think the main contributor to this is that this Kindle is one ounce lighter than the K3. This is a very noticeable difference from the K3. One ounce adds up after hours of holding it in front of you with one hand. I never had a real problem holding the previous version, but this one seems even easier.

    Real Page Numbers – the K3 only displayed a percentage of the book completed or some weird “location” setting that I never understood. The KT displays the actual page number, regardless of what zoom setting you have it on. This is a big improvement for me, especially after I realized how difficult it is for them to be able to do this. This does not work on every book, but most of the popular books I have checked it with have it.

    Book Lending – This is another huge improvement and just another reason to make the jump from regular books to a Kindle. You can finally lend your books to other people with Kindles. You can lend a book only once, and only for 14 days. I am okay with that because I understand the need to curb piracy. My only problem is that the book has to be eligible for this option and so far, most of the books in my collection aren’t.

    Display – Same as before on the K3, with a few improvements. The short flash that you get when turning the page (although I never really notice it) while the Kindle loads up the next page, occurs less frequently. This makes the Touch feel a lot more like a real book. Even though the display is monochrome, the KT delivers very crisp black and white images, and renders photos and images very well. I have tried out the Kindle Fire as well, but I still prefer the Kindle Touch due to E-Ink, which I think looks much better than backlit text, especially since I like to read for 4-5 hours at a time. Reading in…

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  2. Writingtired says:
    2,223 of 2,270 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    First Kindle: Chose Touch over the Keyboard, November 23, 2011
    By 

    I’ve had my Touch for almost a day now, and it’s pretty awesome. I’m not a big reviewer, but I figured several people may be in a similar position as I was yesterday, so here we go…

    I’m definitely an avid reader. Actually, as I type this, I have roughly 1000 books sitting on a wall of shelves behind me. E-readers have always intrigued me, but I’ve never felt like they were worth $199 or more; however, when the Kindle Fire was announced, I thought they had released the Kindle for me.

    I watched video reviews, “hands-on” videos, read numerous reviews, etc. I was pretty sure that I wanted a Fire, but as I thought about it, I wasn’t convinced that the Fire really provided me with access to anything that I couldn’t do on my phone (HTC Inspire 4g). Other than a bigger screen, the Fire was actually pretty limited (for my purposes). I mean, I would only be able to use the browser and watch videos in areas with WiFi (i.e. at home, at work, or at retail location with WiFi). If I’m at home, I’ll probably just watch videos on my tv and access the internet on my desktop or my laptop. At work I’m too busy for the Fire to get much use. And other than the occasional trip to Starbucks (and by occasional, I mean like once a month), I don’t really make use of hot spots.

    SOO…I decided the Fire didn’t really justify the extra money for something I already have access to through my phone, laptop/desktop, or tv. This caused me to run the gambit of reviews for the Kindle Touch and the Kindle Keyboard. Best Buy was advertising the Kindle Keyboard 3G (with ads) for $89, so price wasn’t really a distinguishing feature for me. My thoughts:

    Touch:
    – Kindle Touch is full-on touchscreen, and based on video reviews, it looked a little laggy
    – Kindle Touch will probably drive me nuts with fingerprints/smudges
    – Kindle Touch seems like a digress in touchscreen technology (like using a late 90s ATM)
    – Kindle Touch doesn’t have physical buttons for page turns, which seemed like it would be a negative
    – The $99 doesn’t have 3G, so I’d be limited to Wifi
    – Highlighting and note-taking seems like it would be difficult on a laggy screen
    – Looking up words will probably be easier

    Keyboard:
    – Kindle Keyboard has a decent keyboard and physical page turn buttons
    – Kindle Keyboard has strong support through reviews (not many people don’t love it)
    – The Best Buy sale lets you have free 3G for cheap
    – Fingerprints/smudges won’t be an issue

    After considering all of this, I went to Best Buy absolutely intending on buying a Kindle Keyboard. I got there, and of course, they had demo models of both. I figured, “What the heck…might as well make sure I like the Keyboard more.”

    I played with both for over an hour. I read books, made notes, made highlights, looked up words, went to the menu, back to a book, back to the menu. I went forward through a few pages. I went back through the same pages. I did everything I thought I would normally do while reading. My decision?
    – The Kindle Touch touchscreen does have a slight delay, but it’s definitely not a late 90s ATM. It’s a delay, but just long enough for you to demonstrate a slight bit of patience (and to be honest, if you’re an avid reader, patience is probably a virtue you can easily put into practice. There’s a reason you’re reading a book and not watching a movie.)
    – Highlighting/note-taking is actually much more convenient on the Touch. Just press where you want to start, wait a second, drag to where you want to stop, and click highlight. Much easier (in my opinion) than moving the cursor down to where you want to start with the d-pad, clicking enter, dragging the cursor to where you want to stop, and then clicking enter again.
    – Note-taking is slightly more convenient on the Keyboard simply because you can just start typing (if you’re not overly concerned about the exact line the note is attached to). If you are concerned about the location of your notes, then using the d-pad to move the cursor was not only inconvenient but also uncomfortable (I have pretty big hands, so doing all of this one-handed required me to contort my thumb in a very odd way to use the d-pad).
    – I didn’t really like the keyboard on the Keyboard. The buttons are very heavy, so you have to give them a decent push to register a keystroke. Also, the qwerty layout is not a true qwerty layout, so beware of that. I had to be very conscious of the keys I was pushing otherwise I ended up with notes like: “The Kimdle keynoard is very mice.” VERY ANNOYING (especially if you take a ton of notes…which I do).
    – The page turn button on the Keyboard was very annoying. The page turn button on the demo model gave two very audible clicks when I pressed it. The clicks were distracting, taking me “out” of the book after every page.
    – After thinking about it, the free 3G wasn’t a huge…

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  3. Mediahound says:
    4,523 of 4,637 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A worthy upgrade over other Kindles!, November 20, 2011
    By 
    Mediahound (SF Bay Area, CA United States) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    Customer Video Review Length:: 9:09 Mins

    Please watch my video review here. Thanks for watching and I hope it helps.

    General observations:

    – Controlling/manipulating things on the screen is so much easier with the touch screen-it’s a lot more intuitive!

    – Athough I don’t show it in the video, you can swipe instead of tap to turn pages. You may also use your left hand to page forward by tapping slightly more in from the left edge. It works quite well.

    – Looking up a word is as easy as pressing on that word. No more fumbling with a 5-way controller. You can additionally highlight blocks of text quite easily by just swiping over it.

    – Kindle Touch also has the new X-Ray feature which is really neat. It can be interesting to see a summary listing of facts from a given book about a person mentioned for instance. The Kindle Keyboard does not include this feature.

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